Artist: Conveyor
Title: Theme I (Edit)
Artwork: Hunter Mack
Digital Release Date: May 13, 2014

"Theme I (Edit)" is the first cut off of Prime, a long-playing record written and recorded by the band Conveyor. The music on this record was composed and performed alongside two midnight screenings of George Lucas' THX 1138 (1971) in December 2013 at Nitehawk Cinema in Brooklyn, NY. The bulk of the recordings were subsequently captured live on the 3rd of January 2014 at the Silent Barn in Brooklyn, NY.

Other elements of the two December performances such as lighting effects, costumes, and set design are not represented here, and so this record should not be taken as a permutation of either of those two events but as a discrete object in and of itself. Prime comes at an odd time in the lives of those who have participated in its construction and occupies a borderline frustrating amount of space, and yet as a concept it remains inviolable and pure, denoting a way forward which we have no choice but to pursue.

Tracklist:

01. Conveyor - Theme I (Edit)
02. Conveyor - Theme I (Monster Rally Remix)

DIGITAL DOWNLOAD

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STREAM

Conveyor - Theme I (Edit) by goldrobotrecords

Conveyor - Theme I (Monster Rally Remix) by goldrobotrecords

REVIEWS

"Prime can be enjoyed separate from its point of reference – each theme explores one or more motifs – but the thirteen works are excellent subversions of Lucas’s film. Where the director intended to erase any trace of psychological imagery, Conveyor play Freud in coaxing out THX 1138’s (that’s the name of Robert Duvall’s character.) frantic mind as it faces freedom from drug-induced conformity." - Tiny Mix Tapes

"It’s an interesting foray deeper into the world of electronics once more that the band manages to imbue with their unpredictable spirit." - I Guess I'm Floating

"(A) haunting mesotropic loop caught between an esoteric meditative dance and the joyous bells of a Hare Krishna procession." - Gold Flake Paint

"(B)ack and forth between being a grand, dispassionate epic and a more nuanced study of individuality and personhood." - No Fear of Pop